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Sentence Structure in PowerPoint

On Microsoft » Microsoft Powerpoint

8,831 words with 5 Comments; publish: Tue, 27 May 2008 04:28:00 GMT; (30078.13, « »)

I have a team member in my class that insists that all sentences in

PowerPoint must be full sentences. I stated that with bullets, it is a

highlight of the information that is being presented. (i.e. "The earnings

for the company and it's subsidiaries was a dividend claim of + $0.225 per

share)

On the PowerPoint it would be noted as follows: Companiy earnings increase

of $0.225 per share.

Or am I wrong in this thought...

--

Appreciate all...Megan

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  • 5 Comments
    • I would tend to agree with you if it is for a presentation. If you are

      giving this out for people to read on their own (in place of a report), the

      sentences might be better. Generally, the more verbose you are, the less

      likely anyone is to get anything from your slides.

      --David

      David M. Marcovitz

      Author of _Powerful PowerPoint for Educators_

      http://www.loyola.edu/education/PowerfulPowerPoint/

      "Megan" wrote:

      > I have a team member in my class that insists that all sentences in

      > PowerPoint must be full sentences. I stated that with bullets, it is a

      > highlight of the information that is being presented. (i.e. "The earnings

      > for the company and it's subsidiaries was a dividend claim of + $0.225 per

      > share)

      > On the PowerPoint it would be noted as follows: Companiy earnings increase

      > of $0.225 per share.

      > Or am I wrong in this thought...

      > --

      > Appreciate all...Megan

      #1; Tue, 27 May 2008 04:29:00 GMT
    • Nope, you're not wrong. It's a matter of choice and style, but I prefer yours.

      The slides should *support* the information that the presenter is communicating.

      Too many words and you'll lose your audience while they read the slide and tune

      you out.

      --

      Sonia Coleman

      Microsoft PowerPoint MVP Team

      Autorun Software, Templates and Tutorials

      "Megan" <Megan.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message

      news:A2A6637B-7A69-4B3D-8452-43C83FEF12B5.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.microsoft.com...

      > I have a team member in my class that insists that all sentences in

      > PowerPoint must be full sentences. I stated that with bullets, it is a

      > highlight of the information that is being presented. (i.e. "The earnings

      > for the company and it's subsidiaries was a dividend claim of + $0.225 per

      > share)

      > On the PowerPoint it would be noted as follows: Companiy earnings increase

      > of $0.225 per share.

      > Or am I wrong in this thought...

      > --

      > Appreciate all...Megan

      #2; Tue, 27 May 2008 04:31:00 GMT
    • Thank you so much David,

      I have read your book, it is a honor to have your response. I truly

      appreciate the quick response.

      Megan Diliberto

      "David M. Marcovitz" wrote:

      > I would tend to agree with you if it is for a presentation. If you are

      > giving this out for people to read on their own (in place of a report), the

      > sentences might be better. Generally, the more verbose you are, the less

      > likely anyone is to get anything from your slides.

      > --David

      > David M. Marcovitz

      > Author of _Powerful PowerPoint for Educators_

      > http://www.loyola.edu/education/PowerfulPowerPoint/

      > "Megan" wrote:

      > > I have a team member in my class that insists that all sentences in

      > > PowerPoint must be full sentences. I stated that with bullets, it is a

      > > highlight of the information that is being presented. (i.e. "The earnings

      > > for the company and it's subsidiaries was a dividend claim of + $0.225 per

      > > share)

      > > On the PowerPoint it would be noted as follows: Companiy earnings increase

      > > of $0.225 per share.

      > >

      > > Or am I wrong in this thought...

      > > --

      > > Appreciate all...Megan

      #3; Tue, 27 May 2008 04:32:00 GMT
    • In article <A2A6637B-7A69-4B3D-8452-43C83FEF12B5.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.microsoft.com>, Megan wrote:

      > I have a team member in my class that insists that all sentences in

      > PowerPoint must be full sentences. I stated that with bullets, it is a

      > highlight of the information that is being presented. (i.e. "The earnings

      > for the company and it's subsidiaries was a dividend claim of + $0.225 per

      > share)

      > On the PowerPoint it would be noted as follows: Companiy earnings increase

      > of $0.225 per share.

      > Or am I wrong in this thought...

      It's more a matter of style and preference than of right and wrong.

      I'm with you, fwiw: If the bullet points are complete sentences, they should

      be punctuated accordingly, with a period at the end. That's "full stop" for

      you folks who spell the opposite of b/w so colourfully.

      If the bullet points are just phrases, I don't think periods are necessary (and

      in fact I find them distracting; it makes me think that the previous words were

      supposed to hold together as a sentence, and they don't.)

      The spelling of "it's" in your original sentence *is* incorrect, though. ;-)

      A matter of right and wrong, not of preference and style, that one.

      ---

      Steve Rindsberg, PPT MVP

      PPT FAQ: www.pptfaq.com

      PPTools: www.pptools.com

      ================================================

      #4; Tue, 27 May 2008 04:33:00 GMT
    • Hi Megan,

      Be careful that you do not convey a wrong misleading meaning. Perhaps

      "Dividend $0.225/share" would be both shorter and more accurate. (Not all

      earnings are passed along as dividends)

      The goal of PowerPoint*, when used in support of a live presenter, is to

      highlight and reinforce key points and ideas*. So, think of it as 'what

      would I highlight if this were a book I needed to study?' We've all seen

      the people who highlight every single word in the whole book. In college, I

      knew one girl with a 4 highlighter a week habit. We called her 'Old

      Yellow', but what was interesting about her was that when it came time to

      study, she had no idea what was the important core ideas*. The basic key

      points were hidden in a sea of emphasis. Sometimes the presenter will help

      you understand what they want to emphasize*, sometimes you will be left to

      your own accord. Your job, as a PowerPoint presentation builder, is to

      decide what are the core thoughts and display those as clearly* as is

      possible to the audience.

      PowerPoint

      Key Points & Ideas

      What's Core?

      Emphasis

      Thoughts displayed clearly

      However, as Sonia and David both said, PowerPoint can be used for a number

      of situations where there is not a presenter present. In those cases,

      PowerPoint must carry the full load. The displayed thoughts can not be

      fragments, but will need to be supported by full sentence structure.

      The distinction is very important. A presenter that reads the slides to me

      is redundant and insulting. Slides that repeat back most of what the

      presenter says, are mostly redundant and insulting. Slides that give me

      brief phrases or ideas assist in filing the information learned.

      --

      Bill Dilworth

      Microsoft PPT MVP Team

      ===============Please spend a few minutes checking vestprog2.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.

      out www.pptfaq.com This link will yahoo.

      answer most of our questions, before com

      you think to ask them.

      Change org to com to defuse anti-spam,

      ant-virus, anti-nuisance misdirection.

      .

      .

      "Sonia" <scds.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.nowherebuthere.com> wrote in message

      news:OP$UGE7uEHA.1988.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.TK2MSFTNGP12.phx.gbl...

      > Nope, you're not wrong. It's a matter of choice and style, but I prefer

      > yours.

      > The slides should *support* the information that the presenter is

      > communicating.

      > Too many words and you'll lose your audience while they read the slide and

      > tune

      > you out.

      > --

      > Sonia Coleman

      > Microsoft PowerPoint MVP Team

      > Autorun Software, Templates and Tutorials

      > "Megan" <Megan.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.discussions.microsoft.com> wrote in message

      > news:A2A6637B-7A69-4B3D-8452-43C83FEF12B5.powerpoint.todaysummary.com.microsoft.com...

      >> I have a team member in my class that insists that all sentences in

      >> PowerPoint must be full sentences. I stated that with bullets, it is a

      >> highlight of the information that is being presented. (i.e. "The

      >> earnings

      >> for the company and it's subsidiaries was a dividend claim of + $0.225

      >> per

      >> share)

      >> On the PowerPoint it would be noted as follows: Companiy earnings

      >> increase

      >> of $0.225 per share.

      >> Or am I wrong in this thought...

      >> --

      >> Appreciate all...Megan

      >

      #5; Tue, 27 May 2008 04:34:00 GMT